Japanese Sampler – Treasure purse sashiko block (Post 21)

One of the really pretty sashiko patterns in Susan Briscoe’s book is the treasure purse. It was a complicated pattern to transfer onto the fabric. Which sewing it I had to think a lot about the various junctions where lines of stitching touched each other.

It was fund to so though, and I like the final effect. I also like how the top of bag echos the shape of the ginkgo leaf. It helps to add some coherence to the quilt.

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I’m really enjoying making a sampler quilt. It’s nice to have something without a deadline, where I can just concentrating on getting each piece exactly as I want it. I think it’s also really helping my develop my skills. I’ve tried so many new techniques of the past few months.

I can’t wait to see the finished version now though. I want to be able to check I haven’t accidentally made something that doesn’t hang together well. Just those inevitable nerves I’m sure we all get once we’re committed to a large project and know the end is still a long way off.

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Japanese Sampler – Sashiko edge blocks (post 19)

My Japanese quilt is starting to take shape now. I’m beginning to get a feel for the layout and the balance between the pieced and sashiko blocks. This meant I know I would need a lot of triangle pieces around the edges to square of the quilt.

These were fun, quick little designs to play with now that I’ve done enough sashiko for this quilt to just enjoy getting on with it.

It was nice to have some quick and easy hand sewing to do in the evenings.

They’re coming along quite nicely now…

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I repeated the teapot pattern (on a slightly smaller scale in one of the sashiko edges.

There is a mountain above a lake, which was a really fun one to do.

The moon and clouds is a little abstract, but I’m hoping a crescent shape in the quilting might help bring it out more.

I did a cluster of five bamboo leaves, again just picking out of the central blocks and using it to frame the quilt.

The fan motif is another repeated pattern in the triangle blocks. It looks so different in outline form. It interesting how different styles can change the same motif.

There are a couple of blossom motifs around the edge to. An orange blossom flower with a couple of leaves is pretty. I also like the plum blossom, which normally appears as a circle of three, but I just did one for the edge block.

Japanese Sampler – Knot (Post 16)

I think I’m getting close to having enough blocks for my quilt. My latest iteration of the design calls for 12 x square coloured block (pieced or applique), 6 x sashiko blocks, 10 x triangle sashiko blocks (for the sides), and 4 x coloured triangle blocks (for the corners). I haven’t decided about sashing or borders yet. I want to see how big it ends up after all of those are done.

I returned to Susan Briscoe’s book for another pieced block. I did enlarge this pattern (nervously after my mistake with the Good Luck block)

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Thankfully. It fitted. Whoop! Another finished block ticked off my list.

Japanese Sampler – Kimono (Post 15)

Just like you can’t have a Japanese quilt without a crane, teapot or fan. You can’t have one without a kimono.

With a little bit of internet searching I came across a series of quilts that used a really pretty kimono pattern. Working from the photos I made up my own version of the block (I’m certainly getting more confident at designing my own patterns as this quilt goes along).

I did forget about seam allowances when cutting out the pattern though so I had to be mindful of that when piecing this block. I also forgot I was supposed to have three fabrics so it ended up with just two but I still really like it.

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I think what I like most is that it was the right size! So this block can also go on the front of the quilt. Whoop

 

Japanese Sampler – Square Spirals (Post 14)

Japanese Sampler – Square Spirals (Post 14)

At my local quilting group meeting we recently held a members’ Market Place where we could each bring along things we no longer needed and sell them to each other. We were all a little nervous about the idea but actually it was great. I got rid of some orphan blocks I’d been ignoring for about three years and some books and magasines I wasn’t interested in any longer.

When browsing the other tables I came across a set of sashiko patterns. I couldn’t resist. When I got them home and took I look I found a really tiny little set of interlocking square spirals that someone has drawn by hand. It was only about 2 inches square but it really caught my interest.

Although I think it would look really effective as s sashiko design. To me the solid outline of the shape was shouting for a fabric to fill it. I made up a 12″ version of the pattern and turned it into a reverse applique block.

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Simple, striking, neat. I’m happy.

 

Japanese Sampler – Set Squares (Post 13)

I’m not sure if ‘Set Squares’ is the right name for this block. I saw a picture online and I just wanted to see what it would look like in my Japanese fabrics.

So I made up my own pattern for the block and tried it out…

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I like it. It might not be a traditional Japanese motif but this block was more about me experimenting with my fabric choices and just having the bravery to mix and match my own ideas. I fussy cut the flower in the centre square and had to be careful when cutting the outer triangle to make the black in the patterned fabric didn’t just blend into the black of my background fabric. I only lost one point with black-on-black so I’m happy with that. This block will make it on the front of the quilt. Whoop.